Throw out those mains-voltage halogen spots

Throw out those mains-voltage halogen spots

Philips’ Master LEDspot MV is a spotlight for public areas where lights are on all the time, such as lobbies, corridors and stairwells. Lamps in the Master LEDspot MV range cut energy and maintenance costs but are still bright. They should pay for themselves within a year. These LEDspots are designed as a retrofit replacement for halogen or incandescent spots. The dimmable versions are more efficient still, and help create the desired atmosphere. The DimTone function creates a warmer tone when the light is dimmed to lower intensities.

A GU10 LED lamp from Integral to match halogen

A GU10 LED lamp from Integral to match halogen

To satisfy the demands of designers and customers who remain misty-eyed about halogen lighting, Integral LED has designed a retrofit GU10 LED lamp that it says matches the aesthetic qualities of halogen. The 2700 and 4000K Classic Glow lamps replace standard 50W halogen lamps but use only 6.8W. The output is 380 lumens, more than the lamp it is designed to replace. It’s the cunning reflector and lens design that recreates the sparkle of the energy-guzzling halogen. A ‘fly’s eye’ filter in front of the COB light source projects light forward at high intensity but protects onlookers from glare.

The halogen ban: Just do it!

The halogen ban: Just do it!

In the second installment of our two-part series, Neonlite director Fred Bass argues against the call to keep energy guzzling halogens alive, labeling such a move 'nonsensical.'

The halogen ban: Why it should not happen

The halogen ban: Why it should not happen

Despite pushing LEDs hard, the lighting industry says consumers will be lost if halogen is taken away too soon. And it has other reasons for a reprieve. Part one of our two-part series on the ban. (Tomorrow: Why it should go ahead).

OLEDs: Too little, too late

OLEDs: Too little, too late

It's a mixed bag for organic light-emitting diodes. They're improving and prices are dropping, but LEDs will stay ahead of them until the next big thing comes along, according to a new research note.