Private plane lighting to reduce jet lag of super rich

THE NEXT generation of private aeroplane is set to feature ‘the most advanced circadian lighting system in aviation’, says its maker Gulfstream.

The G700 boasts the tallest, widest and longest cabin in the industry with leading range and speed capabilities. The G700 can fly 7,500 nautical miles at Mach 0.85.

The lighting in the £58 million flagship G700 will recreate sunrise and sunset through thousands of white and amber LEDs, ‘gently coaxing’ its high net worth passengers into their new time zone and ‘greatly reducing the physical impact of traveling halfway around the world nonstop’, says the company.

‘The G700 takes the very best elements from our most innovative products and unites them with cutting-edge advances to create an all-new, advanced-technology aircraft that redefines safety, comfort and range at speed,’ said Gulfstream President Mark Burns.

The G700 boasts the tallest, widest and longest cabin in the industry with leading range and speed capabilities. The G700 can fly 7,500 nautical miles at Mach 0.85.

With up to five living areas, the G700 offers an extra-large galley with a passenger lounge or crew compartment; a six-place dining or conference room; and a master suite with shower.

It has 20 panoramic oval windows, 100 per cent fresh air and a whisper-quiet cabin.

A high-thrust Rolls-Royce Pearl 700 engines power the G700 and, along with newly designed Gulfstream winglets, ensure the aircraft achieves high performance capabilities with its larger cabin.

The ability to fly at faster speeds (Mach 0.90 versus Mach 0.80) gives customers more time, lower annual expenses for maintenance, parts and services, and shorter crew days for safer operations.

Dynamic colour-changing lighting has for several years been used on commercial aircraft, and were pioneered on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

Today, all major manufacturers have options for such lighting but are reluctant to make scientific claims, such as that it assists with reducing jet lag.

Lighting designers point out that as passengers represent different chronotypes (whether they are ‘larks’ or ‘owls’) it's difficult to devise a lighting programme to entrain their circadian rythyms optimally.

Additionally, in a large commercial aircraft, long-haul passengers typically have originated at a variety of different time zones and are often heading to different final destinations, making it difficult to tune suitable lighting.

 

  • Learn more about circadian lighting at LuxLive 2019, taking place on Wednesday 13 November and Thursday 14 November 2019 at London ExCeL. To register for free, click HERE.

 

Pictures courtesy Gulfstream. Copyright 2019.