Innovative light show unveiled in City of London

A DRAMATIC and innovative lighting installation has been unveiled at Broadgate in the City of London.

The light feature comprises a circular five-metre diameter LED ‘screen’ – a fabric backlit by an LED array – which can display dynamic low-resolution graphical art. Picture: Norma Aguilar

Designed by leading lighting design practice Speirs + Major for developer British Land and featuring dynamic content from artists Ronan Devlin and Michael Flückiger, Loom is a light-based artwork and an innovative addition to Broadgate’s public realm art trail.

The light feature comprises a circular five-metre diameter LED ‘screen’ – a fabric backlit by an LED array – which can display dynamic low-resolution graphical art.

‘Loom' is the first art to be displayed on the screen and it was inspired by the Huguenot weavers who lived in the area in the eighteenth century.

The artwork generates sine waves with unique amplitude, frequency and colour characteristics which, in imitation of thread, visually weave visitors' passage through the undercroft of 3 Broadgate.

The LED screen sits underneath the Viewing Gallery at Broadgate and is designed to draw people through the building's archway.

It unfolds in response to individuals passing between Broadgate Circle and Finsbury Avenue Square.

The artists’ software monitors data from people-counting cameras installed in the undercroft, and adds threads to the weave as people enter the space, and removes them as they leave.

The density of the moving weave thus reflects how busy the space is at any time.

Running daily from 6am to midnight, Loom becomes increasingly more luminous as the day draws to an end and night falls.

The installation is based on an RGB-pixel control system and LED array from TLS International, and represents the Canadian company’s first major project in the UK.

The stretched-fabric disfussing screen is powered below by a TLS Digital LumiCloud low-resolution matrix with 4,700 RGB pixels.

‘It’s a really cost-effective solution to low-res matrices like this,’ says Ruxton.

The TLS Digital LumiCloud system comprises a series of narrow circuit boards, each containing a row of pixels, which are attached to a combined 24V DC power, control data and addressing suspension cable to form a substrate-free ladder arrangement.

The installers attach one end to the supporting wall, tension it at the ends, and connect power and data at one end.

The flexible tension cables allow the system to fit many organic and unusual shapes.

It also features a magnetic auto-alignment system which makes large installations easier to install by automatically levelling columns.

Loom will occupy the installation for some time, says Broadgate, after which another artist may be commissioned to make a piece.

The stretched-fabric disfussing screen is powered below by a TLS Digital LumiCloud low-resolution matrix with 4,700 RGB pixels.

 

 

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The artwork generates sine waves with unique amplitude, frequency and colour characteristics which, in imitation of thread, visually weave visitors' passage through the undercroft of 3 Broadgate. Picture: Norma Aguilar
Inside the TLS DIgital LumiCloud. It comprises a series of narrow circuit boards, each containing a row of pixels, which are attached to a combined 24V DC power, control data and addressing suspension cable to form a substrate-free ladder arrangement.
  • See TLS International on stand D30 at  the LuxLive 2019 exhibition.  The show takes place on Wednesday 13 November and Thursday 14 November 2018 at ExCeL London. Entry is free if you pre-register HERE.