‘Progressive dimming’ cuts energy use at Kawasaki plant

A SYSTEM of lighting control dubbed ‘progressive dimming’ has resulted in energy savings of 60 per cent at a Kawasaki factory on the south coast of England.

As well as the energy savings, the comfort level of workers has been improved by the raising of the lux level but implementing a progressive dimming controls strategy.

Kawasaki Precision Machinery produces parts for industrial machines at its plant in Plymouth, where it has been manufacturing for over 25 years.

Making precision parts to a very high specification, perception of fine detail and quality control are of the utmost importance.

After several trials of lighting, the company settled on the Digital Lumens Intelligent Lighting System. The first area comprised of 30 lights, the LightRules server and wireless gateways. Two of the existing twin 70W T8 battens could be replaced with one DLE-24, a 24,000 lumen smart Highbay.

With every Highbay having its own sensor for occupancy and daylight and all controls done in a web browser – it allowed KPM to quadruple the lux level, whilst still achieving a 60 per cent energy saving.

The success of the first installation led them to build on this with the largest section ordered in December and brought in 2019. This comprised of over 134 pieces.

As well as the energy savings, the comfort level of workers has been improved by the raising of the lux level but implementing a progressive dimming controls strategy.

Progressive dimming means the control system can push the lighting timeouts to as short as possible without it being a nuisance to those working underneath the lights.

Their system starts to dim over 30 seconds, after a 30 seconds delay. This means that every light is slowly dimming up and down, squeezing every bit of energy saving without compromising safety.

To date some 439 lights have been installed, saving over 2.5 million kWh and quality has improved.

 

  • Learn more about progressive dimming at LuxLive 2019 taking place on Wednesday 13 November and Thursday 14 November 2019. Entry is free - register and view the full programme of events HERE.