Liverpool banks on LED streetlights

Liverpool City Council is to replace its sodium streetlighting with LED luminaires in a bid to save millions of pounds in maintenance costs.

The council spends around £2.6 million a year on energy costs associated with running the existing 57,000 streetlights, illuminated signs and bollards across the city. The LED lighting will be installed in phases over the next two years as part of a £7 million programme.

The Mayor of Liverpool, Joe Anderson, said that when complete, the new lighting would save over 1,400 tonnes of carbon emissions each year. ‘Our maintenance costs will also reduce by £2.7 million over the next five years,’ he added.

In addition to saving energy and maintenance costs, the whiter light produced by LED sources is expected to improve visibility at night and encourage a greater sense of safety.

The project is being overseen by Amey, which is responsible for the city’s highways and street cleaning. Installation was scheduled to begin in June 2014 in the Fazakerley district, where 1,038 of the city’s oldest streetlights will be converted over a four-week period. The remaining 22,500 streetlights serving 3,214 streets will be upgraded over the next two years.

According to Amey, the LED luminaires are being sourced from various suppliers. There are no plans to introduce a control system at this stage, but this may come as part of the project’s second phase.

[Picture credit: Matthew Dearden / Creative Commons]