How to light a lounge bar

Inside-outside areas are a popular architectural feature nowadays. Especially in urban areas where space is limited, they can visually enlarge the space both from the inside looking out and the outside looking in. Large, full height glazing gives a sense of continuity and flow to the architecture. 

If you are asked to design the lighting for an area such as this and you are unsure how to do it, ask the architect and interior designer for help. Agreeing to what the finished result should look like is almost the hardest part of the design!

One of the benefits of the Reggiani range is that the products are available in many sizes and finishes. You are bound to find the combination of size and colour that suits you.

The watchwords are care and attention. It’s the little details that, overall, make a big impression. As an example, people quite often read or use a laptop/tablet in these areas so you should provide enough local lighting (or maybe a narrow spotlight in the ceiling).

Remember that the seating in these areas tends to be quite low, so you need to make sure no-one gets the chance of seeing a bare lamp.

The use of the space and how it should look will change throughout the day and evening. Dimming and scene setting are pretty much essential elements in getting the design right.

Finally, you do need to take care of the basics. Make sure that steps, ramps and the corners of low tables can be clearly seen. There also needs to be enough light in the seating areas to read and have meetings.

Our space measures approximately 12m long by 7m wide with a 3.25m ceiling. 

The main feature here is the tall Yori pendants with a brushed copper finish and there are nine other finishes available. The Yori is also produced in four different diameters from a ultra-slim 22 mm dia to 95 mm dia. The height can be from 150 mm to an impressive 800 mm. We have used the narrow beam to spotlight the tables and to draw your attention.

Elsewhere, the general illumination comes from the Trybeka on the ceiling. This particular model has an opal diffuser and drops down 15 mm from the ceiling. The effect is to spread light sideways and at high angles giving a 'lift' to the space. These could be dimmed further than shown in our rendering to make the space have even greater contrast.

Outside, we have used the wonderful looking Cell. This is available in a range of colours and so it looks as great by day as by night. It has been shortlisted in the Lux Awards.  

Tech Spec 

Luminaires 

Cell, Yori, Trybeka, Linea Luce

Optical control

Various

Arrangement

9 Pendants over the tables

Electrical load 

Typically 3W – 4W/m2

Pros

Can be tuned to give dramatic effect
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Much of the lighting here comes indirectly from the Linea Luce Slim in the coves. Typically, this emits 1,000 lm - 1,500 lm per metre which is plenty for this type of application.

There is a choice of three beam angles and what is also useful is the high transmittance diffuser. This gives a softer light when you are close to the ceiling. The Linea Luce, in a smaller section, is also used under the bar.

Ceiling lighting comes from the Mood family. This is available in five different sizes, round and square, four beam angles and eleven finishes. Here, we have used a square version with white trim (there is a trimless version) and a 25° beam.

The overall effect is much softer and uniform.

As before, the Cell is used for all the outdoor lighting.

Tech Spec 

Luminaires:  Linea Luce Slim and Mood square

Optical control: various

Arrangement: Continuous Linea Luce plus 15 No 8.5W Mood downlights

Electrical load:  Typically 5W - 7W/m2

Pros: Soft with a hint of contrast
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a more contrasting scheme with an emphasis on wall scalloping and cones of light. We have used fewer but more powerful Mood downlights in the ceiling. These are 130 mm dia, wide beam and 12W. The scalloping is achieved, again using Mood but with 50 mm dia and narrow beam recessed units.

The bottles behind the bar are lit with Linea Luce.   

Tech Spec

Luminaires

Mood and Linea Luce

Optical control

Various

Arrangement

8 No 12.5W Mood

Electrical load

Typically 3W – 4W/m2

Pros

Pleasing patterns
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments 1

Surely "If you are asked to design the lighting for an area such as this and you are unsure how to do it" you should not be doing it in the first place ? Maybe leave it to the professionals.

Leave your comment