Learn from Europe’s biggest human-centric office

THE EXPERIENCES of Europe’s biggest human-centric office are set to be shared by its occupant.

Tomáš Michna, top, will discuss the Innogy project in Prague at November’s LuxLive 2018. The lighting system allows the employees to override the light settings, tailoring the light to their needs or specific work tasks, using a wall-mounted control panel. This touch-button control enables control of lighting and blinds, allowing workers to personalise their immediate environment to suit their preferences.

Tomáš Michna, senior facility manager at energy company Innogy, will reveal the learnings from the ambitious project at this November’s LuxLive 2018 exhibition and conference in London.

The installation has been seen a major endorsement of the concept, with over 2,000 light fittings providing dynamic illumination for 550 workers across 10,000 square metres at the company’s headquarters in Prague.

The LED luminaires are tuned to the workers’ circadian sleep-wake cycles and are designed to stimulate energy levels at set times in the day.

First thing in the morning and for a period immediately after lunch, the lights are set to boost mode, in which they deliver a brightness of 780 lux in a cool colour temperature of 5000K.

This helps to boost energy levels, workplace comfort, vision and performance, says the supplier Philips, which likened the stimulus to ‘a strong cup of coffee’.

The employees may, at any time, override the light settings, tailoring the light to their needs or specific work tasks, using a wall-mounted control panel.

This touch-button control enables control of lighting and blinds, allowing workers to personalise their immediate environment to suit their preferences.

Some 860 unable ceiling luminaires and 96 downlights are programmed to provide different light settings at various times of the day.

Additionally, to optimise energy use, 150 PIR sensors detect human presence and switch the lights off in a room or area when it is vacated.

This combination of energy-efficient LED lighting and controls has cut energy at Innogy by 50 per cent compared the previous fluorescent installation.

The Dynamite lighting system also controls the integrated blinds.

‘We wanted to create an outstanding environment for our employees,’ says Michna.

‘At the beginning of the day the office lights mimic natural daylight, providing a useful energy boost.

The light levels decrease until after lunch when we give another boost to help staff over the post-lunch energy dip.

Nearly 80 per cent of employees surveyed described the new lighting as better or much better than the previous fluorescent tube lighting, and 60 per cent agreed that it contributed to a place in which they wanted to work’. 

A post-occupancy survey of employees found that 56 per cent found the lighting to be easy on the eyes, also contributed to employees rating an improvement in their performance following the renovation.

The consultant on the project was Ediface, the building contractor was BAK and the electrical contractor was Cobap.

 

  • Tomáš Michna will give a presentation about the learnings from the ambitious project at 2.50pm on Thursday 15 November at the free-to-attend Lighting for Workplace and Wellbeing conference. The event takes place at the LuxLive 2018 exhibition and conference in London ExCeL. The show itself runs on both Wednesday 14 November and Thursday 15 November 2018. Entry is free. To view the full programme of the Lighting for Workplace and Wellbeing conference, click HERE.

 

 

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