Revealed: Radical lighting of Elizabeth Line

THE GROUND-BREAKING lighting scheme of the Elizabeth Line – formerly Crossrail – has been revealed to the public for the first time.

The £18 billion railway – which connects west and east London – features indirect lighting delivered from uplights at the top of totems mounted in the middle of walkways. It was considered a controversial choice from an energy viewpoint by some elements in the rail industry, but it manages to achieves the vision of Grimshaw architects that the tunnels should have minimal clutter.

The tunnels were initially sprayed with concrete before being clad with white contoured glass fibre-reinforced panels, which deliver a high level of reflectance for the light.

Additionally, many of the platforms are lit by vertically-mounted LED luminaires, manufacturer by London-based manufacturer Designplan Lighting, over the edge of the platform, another radical departure from accepted norms on the UK’s rail network.

‘The architect had a specific vision of how the platforms should be lit’ says Lee McCarthy, technical applications director at Designplan Lighting. ‘To achieve this we designed a light box to illuminate the platform edges’.

Each light box is 1.5 metre wide by 1 metre high, weighing about 90 kilos with a design life of 30 years. They produce an output of over 6,000 lumens, whilst consuming the energy of a 60 watt household lamp.

Approximately 150 light boxes are required for a platform, so a key consideration was to make maintenance quick and hassle free.

‘For easy maintenance we designed a hinged LED array system to provide access from below’ explains Lee. ‘Using LEDs also provides significant energy savings, as they last up to five times longer than traditional fluorescent lamps.

Controls specialist Delmatic is providing the networked Dali control and management of lighting within front-of-house, back-of-house and external areas across the seven of the central London stations – Paddington, Bond Street, Tottenham Court Road, Farringdon, Liverpool Street, Whitechapel and Custom House – as well as the network of shafts, portals and depots.

The Elizabeth Line, Europe's largest transport infrastructure project, was engineered by Atkins Global with lighting design for the platforms, concourses and escalator tunnels for eight new underground stations, one surface station and five portals of this new railway supplied by GIA Equation. 

The Elizabeth Line includes over 42km of tunnels, 10 new stations and improvements to 30 more. The finished railway, parts of which open later this year, will be an accessible route of 40 stations from Reading and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

The tunnels were initially sprayed with concrete before being clad with white contoured glass fibre-reinforced panels, which deliver a high level of reflectance for the light. The hot-spotting seen here has been exaggerated by the digital photography.

Controls specialist Delmatic is providing the networked Dali control and management of lighting within front-of-house, back-of-house and external areas across the seven of the central London stations – Paddington, Bond Street, Tottenham Court Road, Farringdon, Liverpool Street, Whitechapel and Custom House – as well as the network of shafts, portals and depots.

A render by Grimshaw architects of how the platforms will look while in full service

A Grimshaw architects' render showing the contoured GRP panels at the walkway junctions. An uncluttered look was achieved by gathering several services, including lighting, into the central totems.

  • The lighting of the Elizabeth Line will be explored at the Lighting for Transport and Infrastructure conference, taking place at the LuxLive exhibition at ExCeL London on Wednesday 14 November and Thursday 15 November 2018. Entry is free to specifiers and those responsible for lighting estates in the sector. For more information, click HERE.

Comments

No comments yet.

Leave your comment