Norway pioneers radar-controlled dynamic street lighting

ONE OF the first major installations of radar-controlled street lights has been unveiled in Norway.

Unlike street light dimming in most countries in the world, the dynamic system allows relatively rapid control of light levels in response to the movement of individual vehicles on the road.

Norway has experimented with radar control over the last decade but this installation at Highway 155 near Hole is significant for its length at 5.5 miles (9 kilometres) and the number of radar units installed (220).

The radar units, which are mounted on each pole, detect traffic along the route and its speed. The lights are then increased to full brightness in the path of the vehicle from the default illumination of 20 per cent of full output.

The Eagle Eye radar unit can be retrospectively fitted to existing street lighting columns or fitted during an upgrade. The control unit is fitted to the street light, cabling is connected, the back cover is fitted and the radar detection angle is adjusted in accordance with figures calculated for the specific site. 

It’s calculated that the energy saved is  2,100 kWh a week compared to the lights maintaining full brightness. Breakeven period is estimated to be under five years.

The technology has been developed by Comlight, a tech start-up based in Gralum, southern Norway. It dubs the system ‘motion sensing street lighting’. Each luminaire communicates wirelessly with the others. As soon as any new activity is detected by the closest street light, the light is lit and the detection is communicated to a set number of street lights. As a result, drivers, cyclists and pedestrians will experience normal illumination levels all along their route. In reality, however, there is a limited ‘wave’ of light that follows the road user’s movement and provides safety.

The  control system is configured specifically for each stretch of highway, and takes in account motorist visibility, corners, road topology and the distance between each street light.

The number of luminaires in each light wave can then be set manually in the software. The various settings can changed remotely whenever necessary. The changes are sent to a GPRS-equipped street light, which then automatically transmits the update to all the lights along the stretch of road or in the site.

 

SEE DYNAMIC RADAR-CONTROLLED LIGHTING IN ACTION:

 

The radar unit can be retrospectively fitted to existing street lighting columns or fitted during an upgrade. The control unit is fitted to the street light, cabling is connected, the back cover is fitted and the radar detection angle is adjusted in accordance with figures calculated for the specific site. Another alternative is for the Comlight technology to be integrated into the luminaire. The system is universal and is suitable for all ballast types including 1–10 V, DALI and StepDIM.

It can be adjusted to suit various heights or diameters of pole and varying distances between the lights.

 

 

  • Lux has unveiled the programme for its Lighting for Transport and Infrastructure conference, taking place in London on Thursday 22 February 2018. It includes sessions on glare, light pollution, electric vehicle charging on street lights, street lights asset management, IoT street lighting control and LEDs and mesopic vision. Places are free of charge to those responsible for street lighting assets. To view the programme and register, click HERE.

 

 

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Comments 2

I doubt that this system would brighten the lights for a single pedestrian, and probably not for a single bicycle either. But the two big questions are about reliability and keeping adjustment. If each unit needs precise adjustment then I am guessing that the 5 year payback only include the initial materials costs.

Like we aren't bombarded with enough RF already! Not to mention the ability to coordinate with cell tracking to further document everyone's travels. Privacy is dead!

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