IoT ‘less than awesome’, says innovation czar

All the cogs need to turn and connect correctly for the Internet of Things to take off with consumers.

The Internet of Things (IoT) needs more thought and development before it can take off properly, a top innovation executive at Target has warned.

The admonishment will be noteworthy and sobering to the lighting industry, which in a world of lengthening luminaire life-spans, has pegged IoT as the next big thing.

The creation of a mass network of communicating objects, including smart-light fittings, will not happen until they all speak a common language.

The current bi-lingual network is a non-starter Gene Han, Target’s vice president of consumer Internet of Things, commented at a recent press conference in San Francisco.

‘While we strongly believe that one day the IoT industry will change everything about how we live, we are still at an early stage of this process,’ Han noted.

‘Mass adoption is not happening yet. And, speaking candidly, we’re seeing first-hand that a lot about IoT is simply less than awesome.’

Target, the second largest retailer in the United States after Walmart, will be responsible for selling the new IoT technology.

Mass adoption is not happening yet. And, speaking candidly, we’re seeing first-hand that a lot about IoT is simply less than awesome.

Gene Han, Target’s vice president of consumer Internet of Things 

‘Everyone in IoT knows interoperability, that is, all these gizmos actually connecting to each other is the sticking point,’ said Han who evaluates IoT innovations.

‘Across the thousands of startup products we’re seeing, many are trying to become a platform unto themselves. And we can’t blame them, platforms create incredibly defensible positions.

But we need to get more creative about how we think about platforms. Proprietary communication protocols that make it difficult for other devices to connect to each other? These don’t help the consumer. We don’t have to all hold hands and sing Kumbaya, but we do have to proactively adopt standards that will help the consumer,” LEDs Magazine reported.

IoT light sources will be useless if they lack communication skills. It has also been noted that IoT products are often expensive and tricky to set up in the home.

  • Innovations in Li-fi will be demonstrated at the LuxLive 2016 exhibition in London on Wednesday 23 November  and Thursday 24 November 2016. A special IoT Arena will explore developments in connected lighting and its role in the Internet of Things. Entry is free - register at www.luxlive.co.uk

 

 

 

  • You can find out more about the role the Internet of Things will play in the lighting industry, whether as a means of controlling light or as a source of data, by listening in to our upcoming webinar on IoT on the 26th of October. You can find out more and register to listen by clicking here

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