10 workplaces with cooler lighting than yours

Stuck in a boring meeting? Well, if you worked in one of these buildings, you could at least admire the lighting.

 

Photo: Arne Jennard

1.   ASCOT UNDERWRITING, LONDON
Speciality insurance underwriter Ascot thinks of itself as young, agile and fun. To underline its brand identity, the company appointed Paul Nulty Lighting Design to work on the lighting at its offices in the City of London. PNLD made a feature of the absence of daylight in the lift lobby. Visitors are surrounded by black glass on four sides and Ascot’s logo, illuminated by LEDs behind the glass. In the rest of the space, the lighting does not obstruct the view from the 33rd floor.
 

 

 

 

Photo: Redshift Photography

2.   ROBERT AITKEN INSTITUTE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH, BIRMINGHAM
Lighting in laboratories and clinical institutes must be unobtrusive, but deliver the right amount of light on the task area with minimal glare. Low ceiling heights and medical research equipment can interfere with the lighting scheme, and enclosed fittings should be used to protect the environment from dust. For this project, lighting consultant Couch Perry & Wilkes used the Linic LED linear luminaire from Wila, which can be recessed or surface mounted and has opal or micro-prismatic diffusers for glare control.

 

 

Photo: John MacLean

3.   HSBC, QUAI DES BERGUES, GENEVA
Seam Design’s lighting is intended to bring together the interior and exterior parts of seven 18th century buildings that house HSBC’s Geneva offices. The scheme encompasses a central atrium, office levels, trading floor, staff floor amenities, meeting rooms, dining rooms and executive offices. Lighting is as important as architecture to the scheme, considerately handled and integrated into the material palette of furniture, finishes and architectural detailing, even for service stairs and back-of-house corridors.

 

 

 

Photo: Tom Brill

4.   20 FENCHURCH STREET, LONDON
Lighting designed by MBLD and Integrated is the key to the air of accessibility that permeates the lobby of 20 Fenchurch Street. The designers applied a subtle welcoming carpet of light from an almost invisible source at the front door under the canopy, giving a subtle emphasis on the entrance, after which the reception desk with its backlit onyx front is the focal point. The lift lobbies are the brightest lit area of the lobby, drawing visitors into the building. All light sources are LED.
 

 

 

5.   25 CHURCHILL PLACE, LONDON
The latest 23-storey tower in London’s Canary Wharf is one of the most energy efficient, achieving a Breeam ‘excellent’ rating. PJC Light Studio illuminated the two main entrance lobbies, lift lobbies, toilets on all floors, four mid-tower atrium spaces, an exterior canopy and exterior areas. PJC worked with architect Kohn Pedersen Fox to develop a series of integrated designs that included ceiling slots to discreetly mount downlights and other services above the ceiling plane to maintain visual integrity.

 

 

6.   WORLD CONSERVATION + EXHIBITION CENTRE, BRITISH MUSEUM, LONDON
This new wing of the museum provides an extra nine floors of office and exhibition space, which Arup had to bring together. Conservation studios needed high illuminance, good colour rendering and directionality. Science labs had a number of spaces with specific requirements for electromagnetic compatibility and the spectral output of lamps. Custom luminaires were developed for the conservation studios and office space.
 

 

Photo: Frank Walter (Arup)

7.   LIBRARY AND LEARNING CENTRE, VIENNA
The award-winning Library and Learning Centre in Vienna is the work of architect Zaha Hadid and symbolises a casket that stores a treasure of knowledge. ‘Arup’s goal was to highlight the striking architectural language and illuminate the individual rooms according to their respective requirements,’ says lighting designer Paula Longato. The circulation areas and spaces connected to daylight are lit in a neutral colour (4000K), library spaces and spaces connected to the administrative functions have a warmer light (3000K).

 

 

8.   REID BUILDING, GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART
This new building opposite the renowned Mackintosh building has a series of large double height studios, lecture theatres and workshops. Arup’s lighting team worked with the architect to design the electric lighting, and carried out studies to provide technical support for the daylighting design. Bespoke luminaires were developed for the project, and a daylight-linked lighting control system in the studios helps shrink the building’s carbon footprint.

 

 

9.   ONE PANCRAS SQUARE, LONDON
This Breeam ‘outstanding’-rated building is part of the King’s Cross development. It incorporates 900 of Luxonic Lighting’s chilled beam luminaires over eight floors. Airlux satin lensed small nosecone luminaires have been developed for seamless integration into chilled beam structures, and are supplied as standard with Dali-dimmable control. The lens distributes light asymmetrically up and down to illuminate large open office areas while eliminating glare.

 

 

10.   LEE BUILDING, ETH UNIVERSITY, ZURICH
The architectural office of Fawad Kazi and the lighting designers at Reflexion worked together on the artificial lighting for this building, which incorporates Tridonic’s TalexxEngine QLE LED modules. Each module can be interconnected with plug connectors and up to six can be powered and controlled from a common driver. One luminaire type, the cuboid Minergie, has been used in all the functional areas of the building. The square QLE modules, with a mounting height of only 5.5mm, enabled the luminaire body to have a low profile.

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